CyberBullying and Schools

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Let’s start here.

What is Cyberbullying?

What is your school’s acceptable use policy?

Some schools have developed policies on uses of technology that may affect the child’s online behavior in and out of the classroom. Ask the school if they have developed a policy. You and some other parents and community leaders can work together to find resources and interested individuals if there is none.

Report Cyberbullying

When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.

Rules of the Road

http://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/how-to-report/index.html

Be proactive in making sure that students have ways to cope and education about cyberbullying.

Establish a committee  to inform, educate and let students be proactive.

Defining the School Cyberbullying Problem
All schools, parents and students are struggling to address and contain the growing cyberbullying problem.

While bullying itself is difficult to prevent, cyberbullying is much harder. It starts online and moves offline, or starts offline and moves online or starts and stays online. It happens during the school day on student-owned devices as well as school computers. It happens off-premises, after-hours and bleeds into the school day.

As Parry Aftab has said repeatedly, and the volunteers at WiredSafety who handle cyberbullying cases and help victims and their families know, there is no silver bullet. There is no one answer. But there are many ways to attack the problem, piece by piece.

Schools have approached this in different ways. Many schools have adopted policies and rules that the parents and students have to sign before the students are permitted to use the Internet at school. Some are using filtering products. Others are sending notices to parents and setting policies for safe and acceptable use. Some are trying to regulate student activities after hours and off-premises. And, when they overstep their authority, schools are finding themselves named in lawsuits for infringing on a student’s free speech or due process rights. Far too often, schools lose these lawsuits.

There is no “one size fits all” here. Solutions need to be customized to take into consideration the school’s technology uses and staffing, curriculum, students’ needs and behavior, parents’ concerns, and community values. It is more a matter of awareness about the problem areas than the specific laws, which change often and vary jurisdiction by jurisdiction. All good lawyers know how to spot a potential legal problem. Good school administrators and educators, unfortunately, in these difficult times do, too.

The new issues, such as cyberbullying and how far a school’s authority can extend, and social networking websites, such as Instagram and Facebook.com (among others), create challenges to grapple with and emotional parental responses. Where do we start? We all need to remember that we are still learning, often the hard way. Children are very innovative in abusing the Internet and each other. Sometimes they do this intentionally. But almost as often, they hurt each other with miscommunications, poor digital literacy and hygiene skills.

Just when we think we understand the risks and have worked out solutions, they surprise us with their innovations. But, if parents, school administrators and school boards, teachers, school safety officers, students, guidance counselors and librarians and library-media specialists work together and keep the lines of communication open, we’ll keep making progress. All we have to do is hold out until this new generation of Internet-savvy students become parents, teachers, and school administrators themselves.

Source: Wired Safety

Steps to take Immediately

Stop, block and tell

If you are targeted by a cyberbully:

STOP!
Don’t do anything. Take 5! to calm down.
Block!
Block the cyberbully or limit all communications to those on your buddy list.
and Tell!
Tell a trusted adult, you don’t have to face this alone.
Report cyberbullying to wiredsafety.org

Here is a flash presentation for educating Stop, Block and Tell.

http://www.stopcyberbullying.org/flash/stopblockandtell.html

Don’t respond to and don’t forward cyberbullying messages.
Keep evidence of cyberbullying. Record the dates, times, and descriptions of instances when cyberbullying has occurred. Save and print screenshots, emails, and text messages. Use this evidence to report cyberbullying to web and cell phone service providers.
Block the person who is cyberbullying.

Report Cyberbullying to Online Service Providers

Cyberbullying often violates the terms of service established by social media sites and internet service providers.

Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities sections. These describe content that is or is not appropriate.
Visit social media safety centers to learn how to block users and change settings to control who can contact you.
Report cyberbullying to the social media site so they can take action against users abusing the terms of service.

Report Cyberbullying to Law Enforcement

When cyber-bullying involves these activities it is considered a crime and should be reported to law enforcement:

Threats of violence
Child pornography or sending sexually explicit messages or photos
Taking a photo or video of someone in a place where he or she would expect privacy
Stalking and hate crimes
Some states consider other forms of cyberbullying criminal.

Report Cyberbullying to Schools

Cyberbullying can create a disruptive environment at school and is often related to in-person bullying. The school can use the information to help inform prevention and response strategies.
In many states, schools are required to address cyberbullying in their anti-bullying policy. Some state laws also cover off-campus behavior that creates a hostile school environment.

 

 

internet-of-things

Consult your state’s laws and law enforcement for additional guidance.

 

Federal Laws

Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools (including colleges and universities) have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.

Are there federal laws that apply to bullying?

At present, no federal law directly addresses bullying. In some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment which is covered under federal civil rights laws enforced by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). No matter what label is used (e.g., bullying, hazing, teasing), schools are obligated by these laws to address conduct that is:

Severe, pervasive or persistent
Creates a hostile environment at school. That is, it is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by a school
Based on a student’s race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or religion*
Although the US Department of Education, under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not directly cover religion, often religious based harassment is based on shared ancestry of ethnic characteristics which is covered. The US Department of Justice has jurisdiction over religion under Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
What are the federal civil rights laws ED and DOJ enforce?

A school that fails to respond appropriately to harassment of students based on a protected class may be violating one or more civil rights laws enforced by the Department of Education and the Department of Justice, including:
Title IV and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
Do federal civil rights laws cover harassment of LGBT youth?

Title IX and Title IV do not prohibit discrimination based solely on sexual orientation, but they protect all students, including students who are LGBT or perceived to be LGBT, from sex-based harassment.
Harassment based on sex and sexual orientation are not mutually exclusive. When students are harassed based on their actual or perceived sexual orientation, they may also be subjected to forms of sex discrimination recognized under Title IX.

Are there resources for schools to assist with resolving harassment complaints?

The Department of Justice’s Community Relations Service is the Department’s “peacemaker” for community conflicts and tensions arising from differences of race, color and national origin and to prevent and respond to violent hate crimes committed on the basis of: gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, disability, race, color, and national origin. It is a free, impartial, confidential and voluntary Federal Agency that offers mediation, conciliation, technical assistance, and training.

What if the harassment continues?

If harassment persists, consider filing a formal grievance with the district and contacting the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division.

Source: http://www.stopbullying.gov/laws/federal/index.html#civil

 

 

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Digital Citizenship – Putting the pieces all together to understand what to do!!

Man without identity programing in technology enviroment with cyOffering a Course, a Family Initiative,Global Resources, a Teacher Tool Kit
and Peer Gathered Resources.

Choose your tools for Digital Citizenship Understanding!

This all started 20 years ago with a Clinton Initiative, for the NIIAC.
Imagine you had a device that combined a telephone, a TV, a camcorder and a personal computer. No matter where you went or what time it was, your child could see you and talk to you, you could watch a replay of your team’s last game, you could browse the latest additions to the library, or you could find the best prices in town on groceries, furniture, clothes — whatever you needed.”
The above paragraph was the opening paragraph of the Agenda for Action — 20 years ago.
Today we are still trying to tame technology with resources, peer knowledge and collaboration.

1.COURSE

Course name: Digital Citizenship MOOC for Educators, Spring 2014
Course site: jasonohler.com/dcm2014
Cost: MOOC option is free

mooc
Web definitions
A massive open online course is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web. …
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOOC

Teacher/contact: jasonohler@gmail.com
What is the course about?
This is a course about digital citizenship, a relatively new area of inquiry that has emerged because of our desire to help students manage their digital lifestyles safely and responsibly, without losing their sense of inspiration and opportunity.


How is it offered?

This course is offered in three ways: as a graduate course, a professional development course, and as a MOOC, in that anyone can use the materials and join in all of the conversations that are part of the class. There are no grades awarded for the MOOC class, and there are no costs associated with it except for materials that MOOC participants elect to purchase. MOOC participants do not have to register for the class. However, doing so allows them to stay in touch more easily with others in the course and to receive mailings about the course and associated activities.

Why digital citizenship?

The web is so pervasive and invisible, and provides access to so many different kinds of experiences, that we have developed a keen and sometimes urgent interest in understanding how best to help our children and ourselves navigate this new world.
In the K12 educational arena, this interest has been given the name “digital citizenship,” a reference to our belief that the Internet offers a kind of community experience. Digital citizenship seeks to answer the question, “What does it mean to be a model citizen in this new kind of community?” Ultimately, it also addresses another essential question: “How can we maintain a sense of humanity as we learn to co-exist with the immensely powerful machines and networks of our own creation?”

What is addressed?

In practical terms, the course looks at policies, curriculum, tools and perspectives that address digital citizenship issues within the K-12 educational arena. It also addresses some of the hot button issues of the day, such as cyberbullying, media literacy, and how to make ethical decisions associated with online activities. It features some of the experts in the field, including Mike Ribble (Digital Citizenship in the Schools), Nancy Willard (CyberSavvy), Frank Gallagher (Cable in the Classroom).

Who is this course for?

The primary audience for this course is K12 education community members, including teachers, students, administrators, school board members. But this course is also for parents, community members, anyone from government or business- in short, anyone interested in the larger issues involved in living, learning, working and having fun in the digital age, particularly as those issues impact our children.

Other Resources:
Bullying and Technology: What does it mean for parents?

For Parents and Community
http://evanston.suntimes.com/people/voices/cyb_erbully-EVA-01092014:article

FOSI.org

Family Online Safety Contract
Check out our Resources tab featuring helpful tips for parents and kids during back-to-school season, and download a copy of our the safety contract.
This video might be helpful as well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSQ6GcskLNg
FOSI GRID ( International)http://www.fosigrid.org
FOSI’s Global Resource and Information Directory (GRID) is designed to create a single, factual and up-to-date source for all those dedicated to making the Internet a safer and better place. As a family online safety portal, it aggregates information from a comprehensive range of trusted sources and combined with expert oversight, provides a unique and exciting new collaborative platform.

GRID monitors, tracks and provides commentary on the efforts of countries around the world to make the Internet safer for their citizens. By placing them in their correct cultural context, the educational, legislative and regulatory approach of many countries is seen properly for the first time. GRID is already attracting praise:
“FOSI’s GRID is a remarkable and ground breaking achievement! Nothing can prepare you for the depth, quality and scale of the family online safety content that GRID delivers. It will provide a vital and important new collaborative tool for industry, government and online safety professionals throughout the world.”
Professor Tanya Byron – Leading child psychologist and author of the Children in a Digital World Report, an influential review commissioned by the UK Government.
Using the very latest technology, GRID’s interactive maps, timelines and easy to use features bring clarity and new insights. Comprehensive directories that scope the work of industry and define the challenges, as well as GRID’s expert-moderated updates and quarterly reviews, create a unique ‘one stop shop.’

Who is Parry Aftab.. one of those of us who started out with the Clinton Initiative NIIAC> She is a real Internet lawyer.http://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/2013/12/19/cyberlaw-expert-parry-aftab-talks-cyberbullying-and-online-student-safety-at-the-a-439412.html#.UsgF2_2c8dt

Wired Safety Video on Cyber-bullying. It’s the Best!!
http://stopcyberbullying.org

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Teacher Tool Kit from Wired Safety

Your personalized resource. You can fill out information at the link above to get it.

Stop Cyber Bullying Toolkit is now available! http://stopcyberbullying.org/index2.php
Authored by Dr. Parry Aftab and created by WiredSafety.org,Who is Parry Aftab?
She is a real Cyberlawyer.
the toolkit provides all of the information a school or community organization needs; it also provides young people with a mission.
Through the StopCyberbullying Pledge, they can take a stand against cyberbullying. By taking the pledge they promise to be part
of the solution, not part of the problem. The entire StopCyberbullying program is designed to motivate schools, students,
and their parents to do something, not just stand there while others are hurt. It gives them the tools and information
that they need to create their own grassroots campaign and address cyberbullying and hate online wherever they find it.

Peer Gathered Resources from Scoop.it

child

http://www.scoop.it/t/digital-citizenship-goals-in-education

Vic and Bonnie Sutton
Scoop.it? http://www.scoop.it/

Gamification you ask? Glad you asked. Alex Wonder!!
!Alex Wonder Kid Cyberdetective is a new game introduced by WiredSafety.org designed to help children safely navigate the Internet. Children follow the adventures of Alex Wonder as he helps children learn to identify the warning signs of cyberbullying and learn how to responsibly use the Internet.

“…The game teaches kids how to spot, avoid and address cyberbullying. So, they have to qualify as kid cyber detectives who help Alex, who works out of the janitor’s closet at the middle school, learn how to help other kids being cyber bullied,” explained Parry Aftab, Executive Director, WiredSafety, to CNN in an interview. Download the new free Alex Wonder Kid Cyberdetective Agency Game to help stop cyberbullying
**Requires Adobe Air to Install
bottom of page here ,http://stopcyberbullying.org/index2.html

Digital Citizenship ,Preservice Education Initiative

On SITE 2012 in Austin: So What Is Digital Citizenship?

Posted on March 7, 2012 by JimS in the ETCJournal

Report from SITE2012 AACE in Austin, Texas.

Social Justice and Digital Equity SIG has, with Mike Searson, created a project in Digital Citizenship that is funded by Facebook. We have had our initial planning meeting.. We were at the SITE.org Conference in Austin, Texas.

Digital Citizenship is a concept which helps teachers, technology leaders and parents understand what students/children/technology users should know to use technology appropriately. Digital Citizenship is more than just a teaching tool; it is a way to prepare students/technology users for a society full of technology. Too often we are seeing students as well as adults misusing and abusing technology but aren’t not sure what we can do. The issue is more than what the users do not know but what is considered appropriate technology usage.

You have probably heard about the parent who shot his child’s computer. There was an interview with the student and parent on NBC to explore the incident.

We know a lot of ways in which people have blocked the use of the Internet by cutting the cords, taking away the computer. We think education works better. We use the topic of social networking, but since Facebook is the elephant in the room, here are their resources from the Facebook page:

Facebook Resources for Educators
https://www.facebook.com/education?sk=app_4949752878

Why a PreService Initiative for Colleges and Universities?
We want to give knowledge to pre-service and inservice teachers to prepare for teaching in a digital world. We want to create a curriculum to explore the learning landscape.

Who Else is Interested in Education for the use of Social Media?
In the CyberLearning Conference held at the National Geographic which involved SRI, NGS, and NGS, they shared this information.on Social Media. http://cyberlearning.sri.com/w/index.php/Cyberlearning:Social_Media

 Some National Groups
http://wiredsafety.org/

Family Online Safety Institute

Net Family News

Childnet International

Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use

Cyberbullying.org

Youth Safety on a Living Internet” NTIA
The Online Safety and Technology Working Group (OSTWG) reviewed and evaluated: 1. The status of industry efforts to promote online safety through educational efforts …

You may also have seen this headline. Lady Gaga Goes to Harvard:

Pop star Lady Gaga descended on Harvard University with some powerful friends Wednesday to launch her new foundation aimed at empowering young people. The singer was joined by Oprah Winfrey, spiritual leader Deepak Chopra, and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to kick off the Born This Way Foundation that Gaga’s mother and inspiration will help steer. Gaga spoke to more than 1,100 students from several states, faculty and invited guests at Harvard, urging the young audience to “challenge meanness and cruelty.”

There was a Born this Way Foundation symposium of educators and groups at Harvard, funded by Lady GAGA who is intent on creating a difference using her connection with her audiences to fund an initiative by bringing together McArthur Foundation, Harvard law and education faculty, and Danah Boyd, a Microsoft researcher, as well as other people who have projects in this area. Students were also invited to the initiative, and they had their own meeting with Lady Gaga. Her foundation is BornThisWay.

So we talk about many subjects inclusively when we talk about Digital Citizenship.

The topic of digital citizenship is certainly gaining momentum. In June 2010, the Online Safety Working Group sent a report to Congress titled “Youth Safety on a Living Internet.” There are many organizations and individuals that are working on this topic.

Let us know if you are interested  helping with or being a part of our preservice initiative.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton

The Power of Kindness and Caring about Students and Teachers.. Parry Aftab

As a teacher, most of what I do was prescribed, though I found permission to do many things I liked within the school groups, and groups that support teachers. I found surprising support for students and all the things I care about in emotional learning and intelligence with a group that I never knew about in school. Art Wolinsky and I are friend who have worked together in preparing teachers for the use of technology. He invited me to attend a special conference in Washington DC.  I attend a lot of workshops in DC. I was surprised that this one seemed to be run by kids. What I mean is that children were organizing the events of the day. That was refreshing. There were experts all around. When you travel in DC, you notice the people who come to workshops. It seems we were there to listen and then participate. That was different. We did get to do panels, but the stories of sharing, the events were mostly done by students.

*Art Wolinsky and I have been friends since the use of technology in schools was started. OII.org so we are tech savvy.

The Wired Safety Conference

You may want to know about it so that you can participate in the next one,

http://wiredsafety.org/

You will find lots of resources, information and ideas here.,

About Parry Aftab – WiredSafety.org

Parry is one of the leading experts in cyberlaw and Internet safety and security in the world. Her Internet safety charity, WiredSafety.org, is comprised of thousands of unpaid volunteers, including Parry herself. They help Internet users with anything that goes wrong online and help teach safe, private and responsible interactive technology work. They deal with predators, cyberbullying, harassment and stalking, hate, piracy, privacy and misinformation and hype. Her educational videos and animations are available to share and use.  This was interesting to me that the resources were free.
In schools , usually we have to pay to get good resources . I was thrilled to find out that not only are there great resources , but that the students, were grass roots activists in the program, and I met my first teenangel. You can meet some here.
Nice videos here for you.

Parry comes to the educators at SITE.org

This is how she became an ambassador to the SITE.org community.

As a teacher I never had much instruction about digital citizenship, cyberbullying and the problems of students with technology tools. I am a pioneering educator, but the field has become very large and there are lots of problems to tackle. Social networking is also an area of concern for many parents.

So here were a lot of students, kids, at various levels of learning who were sharing their stories, ideas and creating synergy in their schools. It was fascinating . Parry was the architect of the project, but clearly the students were well trained,  and savvy. Some were doing internships and others creating opportunties for others.

WiredKids Summit – June 8, 2011

Senate Russell Building, Washington D.C.

The summit is given each year entirely by Tweenangels and Teenangels. They give awards to their favorite sites and to people they recognize have made the Internet safer. Kids on the stage, adults in the audience; industry, policymakers, law enforcement. They present research they conduct and teach adults what they need to know.

Often cybersafety messages come from the top down, parents to kids. But almost as often the kids know more about technology than their parents. Every year this summit is given on Capitol Hill, giving the teens and tweens a chance to show leaders in industry and government how much they know.

Senator Menendez provided the room for the summit and was in attendance. Here arecomments from his Facebook page.

Bonnie Bracey’s Blog Post shares pictures and her thoughts about the day.

Art Wolinsky’s Blog Post talks about what WiredSafety and the annual summit means to him amd the thousands of other volunteers around the world.

Leticia’s Tech Saavy Mom’s Blog Post shares what the day meant for her and others.

ABCsThe Ridgewood Chapter of WiredSafety’s Tweenangels presented their version of the ABC’s of Cyberbullyiing. You can download a PDF version of the presentation for use with elementary school children.
Animoto Video of the 12th Annual WiredKids Summithttp://animoto.com/play/X65aiQIriuZ88S1F2ycGEQ?utm_source=teenangels.org&utm_medium=player&utm_campaign=player

Teenangels are WiredSafety’s award-winning teen cybersafety expert group who have been specially trained by the local law enforcement, and many other leading safety …

teenangels.org
But wait there is more. I was working in an educational community of thought and we needed to think about how we could do
preservice education. So I invited Parry Aftab to the SITE.org conference. She accepted, came and shared knowledge with our learning community.  She shared websites, a game, and posters. She shared the idea of the teacher tool kit with us.
Most of all I like the game. I like the game because it is a way for teacher to share the ideas of Cyberbullying and for teachers who use it to learn. I was an alpha learner. Parry teases me about the fact that I got some of the information wrong. It’s true, so the game was modified to create learning and teacher resources. I love it and this website.  Parents, and community people can learn a lot just from the flash presentation on the site.
Stop Cyberbullying
Parent Information
Here is information for parents to learn with
This is a tool and a game. Alex Wonder
We are also reprogramming our multimedia feeder tool, so while we code, visit StopCyberbullying.org and download the Alex Wonder Game from there. And come back for the real thing soon. Trust us, it’s worth the wait. And here are two of our cyberbullying videos/animations. Enjoy!
Wake up and smell the silicon: From smartphones and apps to computers and social networks, technology has permanently invaded kids’ lives, much to the benefit of parents and educators. But with the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad now topping children’s wish lists, kids aged 2 to 5 are more equipped to run apps than tie their own shoelaces. In the rush to place high-tech and mobile devices in so many hands, we’re also doing perilously little to prepare adults and kids alike for life in a connected world, potentially endangering future generations. We must be on the move to create digital citizenship initiatives.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton

CyberBullying

  • Keep kids safe from cyberbullies pdated Thur February 17, 2011
  • Cyberbullying is a growing national concern, with roughly 75 percent of teenagers using cell phones, the most common instrument of harassment. The U.S. education secretary has been talking about it, and the Department of Justice held a cyberbullying summit.
  • Here is a web site with basic knowledge and information to get started.  Stop Cyberbullying.org

    There is also an interview with Parry Aftab on this electronic journal.

    Cyberbullying: An Interview with Parry Aftab

    Posted on February 17, 2011 by admin

    Bonnie BraceyBy Bonnie Bracey Sutton
    Editor, Policy Issues

    Introduction: Parry Aftab, J.D., is the executive director of WiredSafety, a site where victims can receive one-on-one assistance when they have been bullied online. She is the author of a number of books on Internet safety, including A Parent’s Guide to the Internet (1997) and The Parent’s Guide to Protecting Your Children in Cyberspace (2000).

    ETCJ: What is cyberbullying? How is it different from traditional bullying?

    Parry Aftab: Cyberbullying is “any cyber-communication or publication posted or sent by a minor online, by instant message, e-mail, website, diary site, online profile, interactive game, handheld device, cellphone, game device, digital camera or video, webcam or use of any interactive digital device that is intended to frighten, embarrass, harass, hurt, set up, cause harm to, extort, or otherwise target another minor” (WiredSafety). Snip!!

    There is also an interview with Nancy Willard on this site.

    Bonnie Bracey Sutton

    Power of US