Orienteering, STEM Skills that link to GPS, and GIS… Esri Here I Come

There are all kinds of games, simulations and events that kids get to experience on devices. We looked at a simulation of the oil spill on the Ipad.

There are all kinds of games, simulations and events that kids get to experience on devices. We looked at a simulation of the oil spill on the Ipad.

Hands on a globe

Sometimes you think you know all of the answers. I have often worked with kids outside in big spaces. Purposing work in an outdoor lab I never got the connection about electronic orientation. Those girls and boys who worked with me can remember the fun we had at the Outdoor Lab. 

 

Today in Russian I got the feeling that I could have, with some equipment, prepared kids for a future in STEM or STEAM by adding Esri , What is GIS after teaching orienteering.

orienteering

First let’s look at orienteering.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Orienteering is a family of sports that requires navigational skills using a map and compass to navigate from point to point in diverse and usually unfamiliar terrain, and normally moving at speed. Participants are given a topographical map, usually a specially prepared orienteering map, which they use to find control points.[1] Originally a training exercise in land navigation for military officers, orienteering has developed many variations. Among these, the oldest and the most popular is foot orienteering. For the purposes of this article, foot orienteering serves as a point of departure for discussion of all other variations, but basically any sport that involves racing against a clock and requires navigation using a map is a type of orienteering.”

We know where we are with technology, our phones, our computers and hand held devices. I Think to gain skills that
we should involve more hands on. This training here in Samara is a year long project with two main events for the students, and sometimes an event for disabled people which is done differently. The students go to the Cacausus Mountains and camp out to do the event. It is done by boys and girls and the coaches and volunteers are men and women and

http://www.catchingfeatures.com/ is where you learn.

The game?
Catching Features is an orienteering game you can play at home. Use it for rainy-day training or rest-day enjoyment. Several different modes of play are available. Individual courses are run with interval starts against computer opponents, or with a mass start against lots of them. Relay events allow you to run one leg of a forked relay course.

Each course you run will earn you a number of ranking points based on the other runners that day. By earning more points you can unlock additional events to run.

Internet play allows for races against human opponents all over the world in real time. Race against your friends in a virtual competition! And you thought you didn’t have anything to do at work…

Can’t coordinate a multiplayer game against anyone else, but still want to compare times? Competitions mode allows you to download and run a race whenever you can, then your splits and route choice are automatically uploaded to the CF server for everyone to see and compare!

A random map generator lets you create an endless supply of maps and courses to run on. You can run on a different map every day for the next 89 years…

A map editor is included with the full version of the game. Used for editing maps and planning courses, it allows full control over terrain, vegetation (down to individual trees and rocks), objects (tables, fences, boats…) and all other aspects of the map. An OCAD file converter lets you start building CF maps from your favorite local terrain.

You can also use the included Ocad Converter to convert your library of Ocad maps into playable CF maps! Train on your home forests!

That is the simulation!!
Hear are pictures of the real thing using tools.orient

From Russia with orienteering tools.

What is GIS?
http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/science/technology-sci/gis_journey/

A geographic information system (GIS) integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information.

GIS allows us to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends in the form of maps, globes, reports, and charts.

A GIS helps you answer questions and solve problems by looking at your data in a way that is quickly understood and easily shared.

Map Your Passion. Transform Our World.

We’re passionate just like you. Geography is at the heart of a more resilient and sustainable future and allows a deeper understanding of how we can positively impact the future. Together we can transform our world.

Features

Tell Your Story

Inspire action, connect with the public, and reach donors by telling your story with maps. Quickly combine location data, text, and multimedia to build interactive apps that highlight your work and advance your mission.

Monitor and Evaluate

Manage your operations, examine their efficiency, and provide transparency to donors. GIS provides operational awareness throughout your organization and analytics that support your decisions.

Collaborate with Others

Share your maps and data on your web pages, blogs, social media, and custom apps. ArcGIS Online gives you an easy-to-use and intuitive workspace for collaborating with others inside and outside your organization.

From Edutopia

Student Work: Street-Tree Inventory
Luis and his peers in the 4-H Tech Wizards program used personal digital assistants (PDAs) and geographic information system (GIS) technology to collect tree data and generate computerized maps for the City of Hillsboro Planning Department.
http://www.edutopia.org/digital-generation-technology-data-mapping

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The Magic of Maps, GIS, the Wonderful World of Geography Awareness Week

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND DIGITAL EQUITY- SIG DE NOTES FOR NOVEMBER

Posted on November 9, 2012  Bonnie Bracey Sutton

I have always loved working with maps, globes and books.Now my learning is facilitated by the use of media and new ways of mapping. And then there is GIS. What is GIS? You use it in invisible ways. GIS.. here is a great video on it. GIS Day is on November 14, 2012.

Ask your elected officials to support funding for geography education.

Learn more about Geography Awareness Week

Geography Awareness Week there are a lot of online tools. There are things to use in your classroom, and a toolkit and a poster. You may want to start with this map tool. Free map kit.. and resources.

While studying at the National Geographic, I became involved in the study of geography. To study our neighborhood we collected various kinds of maps that showed the school community. We were located in Arlington , Virginia and we had a business map, a tourist map, a Virginia transportation map, a real estate map, and a map of historical places as well as a map that showed projections and plans for the future. That was before we all had our fingertips on technology to see this things online.  Children drew a map that showed the path from school to home. That was a fun exercise. The children were quite creative about making their personal maps. A person from USGS gave us maps of cities around the world, but they were not identified, they were in effect a view of cities from the air, New Orleans, New York, San Francisco, Cairo, Egypt, The Maldives, and other interesting places.

York, 

Pictures from an ESRI Conference to show every day resources original post in the ETCJournal

Here are some of the resources I used in an elementary program

Geography


Helping Your Child Learn Geography
A 32-page booklet, published in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education and the National Geographic Society, that is designed to help adults stir children’s curiosity about geography. Includes many suggestions for simple activities. K-4.   Icon for classroom activities  Icon for lab resources
Map Adventures 
This on-line teacher packet for grades K-3 teaches basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand and use maps. The kit includes seven lesson plans, activity sheets, and a printable poster.   Icon for teaching module  Icon for classroom activities
What Do Maps Show? 
This on-line teacher packet for upper elementary and junior high school students has four lessons on reading and using maps. The packet includes a teacher’s guide, four printable activity sheets, and three maps in PDF format that can be downloaded and printed on 8.5″ x 11″ paper.   Icon for teaching module  Icon for classroom activities
USGS Geography Products
A list of online fact sheets, booklets, and educational resources related to geography and mapping.

The National Atlas of the United States


National Atlas of the United States®
This invaluable educational tool is a free, interactive version of the traditional paper United States atlas. Most information is designed to depict geographic patterns and trends on a national scale. Topics include agricultural use, forestation, population density, transportation, and more. Use the Map Maker tool to create custom maps or print one of hundreds of pre-formatted page-size maps that are excellent for classroom use. This is the best source for creating quick maps that cover large areas.   Icon for lab resources
Outline Maps of the United States – Printable Maps from The National Atlas
Download or print PDF files for several different outline maps of the United States, individual states, and counties within a state. Files print on 8.5″ x 11″ paper.Icon for lab resources
Latitude and Longitude – The National Atlas
Article describing latitude and longitude and related terms.

Topographic Maps


Topographic Map Resources for Teachers
An overall summary of useful USGS resources for working with topographic maps: where to get them; how to interpret them; how to use them; explanations of coordinates, datums, and projections; and lessons for the classroom. Also available as a 2-page PDF file.
Free Digital USGS Topographic Map Quadrangles
Download free USGS topographic map quadrangles in georeferenced PDF (GeoPDF) format by clicking on “Map Locator” on the USGS Store Web site. These files were created using high-resolution scans and average 10-17 megabytes in size.

You can participate, facilitate, learn using GIS.
GIS Day provides an international forum for users of geographic information systems (GIS) technology to demonstrate real-world applications that are making a difference in our society. We who use media on a daily basis use the tools of supercomputing , GIS and visualization and modeling without knowing it.

Never mind that geography and maps were not a part of my training for teaching. Geography?  We see the world in media almost daily. Sadly we do not necessarily teach our students formal geography.

I studied at the National Geographic I learned to read, study, analyze and ( fold a map). We had Map Maker Interactive. That is  an incredible piece of technology.I

You may need Inspiration. In a way students use some mind mapping programs to think about the world.

When I was a new teacher long ago, people often fought over the maps that were available in schools for students . There were these blue outline maps. They were limited in supply.

Here are some tools.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/63439000/jpg/_63439803_newcomp.jpg

State Interactive maps. You can investigate any state you want to explore.

One treasure chest of a site is MyWonderfulWorld.

interactive map. This is a homicide map of DC. You can check the homicides in your neighborhood. You may not want to know this big data, but in an emergency, it is big data that is collected to allow experts to assess the damages and know what to do.

Teacher? From the My Wonderful World Web Site.

10 Ways to Give Your Students the World

1. Show students that geography is everywhere.
It’s a global world, with people, ideas, and products moving rapidly around it. Today, how we live shapes, and is shaped by, where we live—and what happens in the natural environment. Find resources to build geography awareness in your school. Have your students test their Global IQ and practice withonline games.

2. Bring it up.
Is your school doing enough to prepare students for a global future and to tap into their natural curiosity about real-world issues, from the local to the global? (Find out with our school checklist). Start the discussion with other teachers, parents, administrators, and students. Spread the word about My Wonderful World to your colleagues and friends.

3. Find global connections close to home.
Have your students log their global connections over a period of time (a day, a week, or more): who they talk with, what they eat, what they wear, what they read, watch, listen to. Make maps and globes focal points in your classroom and use them often. Bookmark an online atlas or print out outline maps. Use posters, pictures, and other visuals to show global connections near and far.

4. Explore the planet using technology.
From free 2-D satellite maps to 3-D Earths, there’s possibility like never before to see our planet in new ways. And zooming into places can create a new perspective on how geography impacts current events. Learn about Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and how it’s changing the way we explore.

5. Make geography part of every subject.
Every subject—from reading, writing, and arithmetic to science, economics, and foreign languages—can include geography. Use real-world examples and data (from sources such as the CIA World FactbookPopulation Reference BureauNational Park Service, or World Heritage Sites) when teaching other topics. When you can, use geography standards-based lesson plans. Prep students for the AP Human Geography test and urge them to take it. And make geography fun—enter your school in theNational Geographic Bee and other competitions.

6. Make it extracurricular.
Ask your parent-teacher organization to study the issue and devise ways to bring more geography learning into school. Enlist administration and parent leadership for evening or Saturday programs, festivals, competitions, field trips,geography/international clubs, and other events. And join your local geographic alliance to connect with peers.

7. Connect students with people from other countries and cultures.
More and more kids are using digital and online tools to interact with friends. Help them connect with peers overseas in order to practice languages, develop collaborative projects—even get to know time zones or the International Date Line. Check out programs from the ePalsPeace CorpsiEARN, and the Asia Society.

8. Help students envision their futures.
Many kids today will cross physical borders but even more will travel through technology. Inject geographic themes into career exploration. (Here’s a geography career guide; also one for GIS and one for international careers.)

9. Go there!
Remind yourself and your students that learning about new places and cultures is about exploration—you don’t always know the exact path to take or what you’ll find along the way. Take your kids on field trips and look for opportunities to seek adventure and educate yourself about the world firsthand. Consider study abroadfield researchteaching overseas, orgetting a grant to support new practices in your classroom. Hear international experts speak at your local World Affairs Council events.

10. Sign up for the My Wonderful World e-newsletter.
You’ll get helpful tips, the latest news, links to great resources and fun games, information about contests and offers, and much more. Sign up now—and help give your students the power of global knowledge.

Passport to the World, Geography! Are you Up to Date?

On the Great Wall

No one has ever described the Great Wall in the media to my satisfaction

There are children who do not know the intersection of geography, history, story and maps.

Actually there are lots of people reporting the news to us from various media platforms who have little in the way of geography education or real knowledge. It is a national shane.

There is a tool that we can all use at http://www.mywonderfulworld.org.

There are resources for teachers that are incredibly wonderful at the National Geographic Society.

There are also alliances, that you can join in your state. The alliancesare here.. More resources are here. Resources

The Alliances

Geography Education Alliances connect K-12 teachers with university faculty, offering professional development opportunities and promoting improvements in geographic education at state and local levels.( http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/program/geography-alliances/) The alliances breakj the silos of education , you have the professors, researchers, professional photographers, teachers , all working for change in a state. The resources and the opportunities are many.. My principal joined the alliance and went to some conferences with me.  I love going to Geographic conferences. They are an experience to learn a LOT from.!!! Geography is an adventure.

Vendor solutions for Geography? Well there is a lot that is free on the National Geographic Education site.

Classroom materials have been developed by geographers and geographic educators to teach the field as a discipline rather than through fact and recall. I was lucky enough to be a geographic educator a teacher, before technology called me to national service with the White House for a long term initiative. NIIAC.

Cast the students as researchers who use geography to solve real world problems. Each activity:introduces a skill for analyzing data geographically provides information about a specific place employs a specific kind of map (isoline, choropleth, profile, etc., illustrates a useful explanatory theory of modern geography. What is geography? See this cartoon for a visual definition

The 21st Century Partnership has added geography to their skills bank.

Here is a philosophical discussion about geography. Title:

Reconceptualizing Geography as Democratic Global Citizenship Education

Find the reference here in a PDF

(Bednarz, 2002)

Teaching geography in this manner is far better than didactic traditions if one values critical thinking and the development of transferable student insight about spatiality. Yet this still falls short of what we have described as democratic citizenship education.

As a teacher, I was lucky enough to be involved in a National Summer Workshop from the National Geographic Society. I was teaching in Virginia and there was a great Alliance that I was able to learn from and work with. My mentor was killed in the (/11 crash at the Pentagon. They were taking students to a meeting in California. The Virginia Geographic Alliance was a rich resource for me and other teachers.

History can be boring, but not if you use the resources available to make it real. GIS, GPS, Stories and pictures , the Internet and You Tube, enhance a lot of what you THINK you know.

In reality do you know place geography? Interactive Maps?

What is Geography?

Children, parents and the media audience see the world without really knowing much about the cuture of the groups that we talk about. A real friend of mine has NO understanding of the cultures that are in the Middle East. He told me that “we” liberated Arab women? I was too challenged to peacefully explain that he did not know the culture to reply. I think that also such misconceptions are best solved by the person with the misunderstanding. But what would lead him to such a misunderstanding. What does he read? What did he learn? What is his guide to the world? Perhaps some one of the many media minute mavens. Those reading the scripts on TV. often have no geographical idea of where the place is that they are talking about.

Maps. Maps. Maps. are here.

I like the articles that talk about geography education. Many school systems do not use geography as a subject of interest, because it is not tested. It may be offered after the fact. That is because of the politics of education, and the lack of knowledge of those with the power to make a difference in real world education.

My husband and I have traveled to many places in the world. Vic has lived in Africa, and started his career teaching English as a foreign language in Africa. His parents were missionaries to China,

I have lived in Greece. I thought I knew Greek History and the literature. I thought I did. I only touched the surface of the information available at the time. I loved living in Athens, and studying various elements of the Greek History. I particularly loved the  studying in the museum in Thessalonki, Greece.

All Roads Lead to Rome

I started my world ttravels late, on a Fulbright to India . Travel experiences, seeing your own country from afar are also quite an education. You can believe we have some very interesting discussions in our household about various elements of culture in the places we have lived and worked.

Earthwatch was a project related to something I was doing in the geographic. It was my first scientific study sponsored , to learn archaeology , of the Beaker people. But what little real history of the area of the Med did I have. Not much. That experience was eye opening to me.

But the definition geo-literacy probably is best for us in a media centric world. You will love the visualization of the topic on the page. You might also like the longer definition and explanations by Dr. Danny Edelson Photo: Daniel Edelson.

A geo-literate population can make far-reaching decisions about their health, their environment, and their community.

http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/geoliteracy/?ar_a=1&ar_r=1

National Geographic Society Education Network www.ngsednet.org 

For updates and newletters, sign up here.

This is a beta site

http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/programs/?ar_a=1&ar_r=1

Do you know Science on a Sphere. It is a transformative use of media to teach. It is awesome.

I was working with NTIA, NOAA, when I was pulled away from Geography as my main sphere of Interest.
NOAA is a federal agency focused on the condition of the oceans and the atmosphere. It plays several distinct roles within the Department of Commerce with a broad mission. Some of NOAA’s more widely-known divisions include the National Weather Service, The National Hurricane Center, and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Science On a Sphere (SOS)® is a room sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display planetary data onto a six foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. Researchers at NOAA developed Science On a Sphere® as an educational tool to help illustrate Earth System science to people of all ages. Animated images of atmospheric storms, climate change, and ocean temperature can be shown on the sphere, which is used to explain what are sometimes complex environmental processes, in a way that is simultaneously intuitive and captivating.

Science On a Sphere® extends NOAA’s educational program goals, which are designed to increase public understanding of the environment. Using NOAA’s collective experience and knowledge of the Earth’s land, oceans, and atmosphere, NOAA uses Science On a Sphere® as an instrument to enhance informal educational programs in science centers, universities, and museums across the country. Science On a Sphere® is available to any institution and is currently in operation at a number of facilities in the US.

See if you can get a kid to move, when there is this exhibit to learn from. It is mostly in museums or may be coming to a conference near you.

FInally, the 21st Century Partnership now shares the ideas of geography, and they have involved schools in the blueprint. Here is their set of resources.

   Games in Education , yes, yes and yes,

Featured Games

  • Photo: A screen from the games Lost Chronicles-Fall of Caesar, showing Brutus walking through an ornate hall

    Lost Chronicles: Fall of Caesar

    Reveal the conspiracy behind Caesar’s murder in this hidden object investigation. Meet historical figures, including Marc Antony, and learn of their role in the conspiracy.  Explore historically-detailed locations in Rome and Greece, searching for clues, as you follow the path of Marcus Brutus after he murdered Caesar.  Play various mini-games, puzzles, and more, and access informative articles courtesy of National Geographic in this compelling game.

     

  • salem-game.jpg

    Lost Chronicles of Salem

    Help a mother and daughter who have been accused of witchcraft escape superstitious mobs in this captivating hidden object thriller. Explore 1692 Salem in richly detailed screens, and play mini-games like word jumbles, puzzles, and more.

     

  • Photo:  A photo montage of migrating animals--zebras, crabs, butterflies

    Great Migrations

    Based on the breathtaking National Geographic Channel miniseries Great Migrations, this game challenges you to protect and guide your animals on their dangerous migration journeys. Select a leader, collect your herd, evade predators, and heal all wounds!

     

  • Photo: Logo of the game Build It Green--Back to the Beach

    Build It Green: Back to the Beach

    You love this tropical island, and now it is up to you to protect it and everything around it. Build it green

    I cannot share everything that is of the National Geographic. Go to the home page, sign up, sign in and get working.

    Bonnie Bracey Sutton

    Victor Sutton

    PowerofUs