Cooking Up STEAM, by Bites and Bytes,YUM!

Delicious Doings in the Classroom or After School Program!!

Mucca - Learning about the Cow and Milk

Hands on Learning

Many of us have had a fascinating whirl on the Internet learning about foods,recipes and ways to involve the joy of cooking, or eating.

I like this site.   http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/  

You can discover how a pinch of curiosity can improve your cooking! Explore recipes, activities, and Webcasts that will enhance your understanding of the science behind food and cooking. No need for package services to deliver ideas to you.

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It has in the “Science of Cooking”, sections on candy, bread, eggs, pickles , meat, and seasonings.

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CANDY

BREAD

Person Holding Egg

EGGS

PICKLES

Variety of meat products including ham and sausages

MEAT

The series of live Webcasts explores the science and culture of cooking. The guests include noted chefs, food chemists, and nutritionists, and they take field trips to investigate famous kitchens and farms!

 

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National Geographic taught us how to think about the way in which foods traveled to our world. There used to be a lesson on a Chocolate Bar. ( How it Becomes a Chocolate Bar_)

Here is that lesson. http://www.iupui.edu/~geni/documents/Worldinacandybar.pdf

Here is a story of chocolate, a kind of story map. http://www.magnumicecream.com/us/en/the-history-of-chocolate.html

                              INVOLVING FAMILIES , and COMMUNITY

I like to get recipes from the class, and sometimes I would have a potluck dinner and parents and I would make a class cookbook. Each student brings in a special family recipe and when compiled together, you have a class cookbook.  I was lucky to have parents who wanted to be a part of helping to teach the Accidental Science of Cooking.

My classes were multicultural. My school had grants that were given to teachers for classroom work. The county also funded projects. With the funding our class got utensils, pots and pans , a two burner hotplate ,and a convection oven. Cooking was gently inserted into the curriculum. STEM, STEAM, whatever.

National Geographic has this :

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/matter-taste-wbt/

 

There was also a Kidsnetwork  NGKN unit on Nutrition and “What are We Eating”.

A great starting point. 

Planet Food

The Planet Food interactive aggregates the contents of your meal to generate a map showing the global footprint your plate makes before it even gets to your plate, and puts you in charge of the world wide journey a bar of chocolate will take before it gets to you.

PLANET FOOD

Welcome to Planet Food. Win lots of virtual badges by completing challenges that get you thinking about where food comes from, and how it gets to your table.

Eat: The Story of Food

Documenting dinners around the world. 

These days, documenting our dinners for the Internet is a universal pastime: sharing your food means that you don’t dig into your plate until you’ve taken a picture of it with your phone and posted it to your social networks. National Geographic gives us photos from around the world.

It is easy on the Internet to look at pictures of food.  Families , schools and communities often come together to explore, examine, and eat food.

 

There are these wonderful areas to explore and tailor to your programs

My favorite is the accidental science of cooking 

The program is from the Exploratorium in San Francisco.
Discover how a pinch of curiosity can improve your cooking! Explore recipes, activities, and Webcasts that will enhance your understanding of the science behind food and cooking.

 

At the Department of Educations Game Expo I found Chef KOOCHOOLOO

 

After School Programs

Chef Koochooloo’s after school program blends humanity’s oldest means of socialization—cooking and eating together—with its most modern lessons. Their master chefs lead classes leveraging  iPad applications, framed around recipes from a specific country or culture. As they prepare food together, kids learn about cooking-related math and science skills, and social-responsibility. Additionally, we emphasize healthy cooking techniques. Most after school sessions are one hour long, unless the school requests a two hour program. Their teachers have been trained in food safety and culinary arts. Each classroom experience includes a food science experiment, and a fun unique geography lesson.

Their mission is to excite kids by discovering the world through healthy, collaborative cooking classes, enriched with STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics learning). Their vision, to improve the health, happiness and education of children worldwide, through dynamic curriculum and engaging gamified technology.

There is an APP for that. Chef KooChooloo !!

 

  Go Graphic, Story Map

A fun thing to do is to have students map how a food got to America, building a story map from ESRI. Here is where to start.

MAKE A STORY MAP

 

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                                                            USING ESRI TOOLS

Start telling stories here. https://storymaps.arcgis.com/en/my-stories/

Some outcomes that I had were unexpected. Families helped my class to build a classroom garden. There were grants that we found , one parent turned over the earth and started us growing. I had quick learning to do.pexels-photo-704818.jpeg

 

Another small miracle is that we began to grow herbs. A parent brought us plants which we put in the school window. Francesco De Baggio, shared with the class how to raise herbs in the classroom windows.

That was a big hit. I had never used fresh herbs. Not being Italian, I did not know that much about pasta either. It was a fun learning journey.

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You need a grant?https://www.nationalgeographic.org/grants/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Game On… Learning with Serious Games

I am excited !
I am taking students to the Game Expo at the Kennedy Center. You may want to read this blog because their are links for some serious games and for the online part of the program that was / and will be aired.
https://blog.ed.gov/…/time-play-learn-2019-ed-games-expo-k…/

 

Game-based learning is gaining popularity in education as more young people and adults learn from games both in and out of the classroom. Well-designed games motivate students to actively engage in content that relates to coursework and master challenging tasks designed to sharpen critical thinking, problem solving, employment and life skills.

Every year, the ED Games Expo promotes game-based learning though the display of exciting educational games and technology.

 

As a teacher, when I initially used games in education , I got push back . My students were having fun in education. That was back in the days of MECC.

 

Eventually , I was on the board of MECC and other game based learning initiatives . I think pioneering games was a little difficult. ( It was FUN!) I learned that the students who were best in remembering information, might not be the ones who could best play a game. I was able to infuse confidence in students with their games based performances. I was able to personalize their learning by letting them explore using authentic games based learning. I had to learn the games too. Worked for me. We had something to talk about.

The ED Games Expo took place on January 8 from 4-8PM at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The Expo was free and open to the public.

Expo attendees were able to  demo 125 educational learning games while meeting the developers. The games and technologies were for students of all ages in education and special education and cover topics including STEM, reading, social studies and social development. Many incorporated emerging technologies, such as virtual reality, 3D printing, engaging narrative adventures and puzzles.

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Here are some games for your involvement and examination.

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Physics Playground
https://youtu.be/1TolHLe_uRg

Reading
https://youtu.be/3tvquxy9PeU

Social Studies
https://youtu.be/v9XqLo4hCEU

Zoo U
https://youtu.be/Vfyax3F3_ck

Hololabs Champion Trailer
https://youtu.be/OaIUD-6hSGA

Parametric DESCARTES PhaseII Proposal
https://youtu.be/DC1iTxzx40o

MidSchool Math
https://www.midschoolmath.com/empires-video

Alpha Bear Trainers #2
https://youtu.be/xtqd9AvUrmU

internet-of-things

This year the Expo hosted activities to showcase the role of STEM and the arts in the development of learning games. On January 7 from 10AM-2PM, eight learning game developers provided TED-style talks to Washington, DC-area students titled “How The Game Was Made.”

The talks will be live simulcast and available as recordings on the Kennedy Center website.

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The talks illustrated the many roles that it takes to develop games, including the concept creator, engineer, coder, web designer, graphics artist, script writer, musician, teacher, education researcher, learning scientist, business expert and more. The talks were intended to inform and inspire students in their own education and future career aspirations, from STEM to literature to the arts to thinking like an entrepreneur.

The Learning Game Awards, a special competition launched this year, will showcase the original “Art,” “Musical Scores” and “Video Demonstrations” in the Expo’s learning games. Be sure to check out the entries and vote for your favorites.

https://edgamesexpo2019.weebly.com/

Many of the games and technologies at the Expo were developed with funding from more than 25 government programs, including ED’s Small Business Innovation Research program, the Institute of Education Sciences, the Office of Special Education Programs, the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education and the Office of Innovation and Improvement.

You can link on Facebook to learn more.
https://www.facebook.com/ED.gov/

BLOG.ED.GOV
Game-based learning is gaining popularity in education as more young people and adults learn from games both in and out of the classroom. Every year, the ED Games Expo promotes game-based learning though the display of exciting educational games and technology.
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