Digital Citizenship – Putting the pieces all together to understand what to do!!

Man without identity programing in technology enviroment with cyOffering a Course, a Family Initiative,Global Resources, a Teacher Tool Kit
and Peer Gathered Resources.

Choose your tools for Digital Citizenship Understanding!

This all started 20 years ago with a Clinton Initiative, for the NIIAC.
Imagine you had a device that combined a telephone, a TV, a camcorder and a personal computer. No matter where you went or what time it was, your child could see you and talk to you, you could watch a replay of your team’s last game, you could browse the latest additions to the library, or you could find the best prices in town on groceries, furniture, clothes — whatever you needed.”
The above paragraph was the opening paragraph of the Agenda for Action — 20 years ago.
Today we are still trying to tame technology with resources, peer knowledge and collaboration.

1.COURSE

Course name: Digital Citizenship MOOC for Educators, Spring 2014
Course site: jasonohler.com/dcm2014
Cost: MOOC option is free

mooc
Web definitions
A massive open online course is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web. …
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOOC

Teacher/contact: jasonohler@gmail.com
What is the course about?
This is a course about digital citizenship, a relatively new area of inquiry that has emerged because of our desire to help students manage their digital lifestyles safely and responsibly, without losing their sense of inspiration and opportunity.


How is it offered?

This course is offered in three ways: as a graduate course, a professional development course, and as a MOOC, in that anyone can use the materials and join in all of the conversations that are part of the class. There are no grades awarded for the MOOC class, and there are no costs associated with it except for materials that MOOC participants elect to purchase. MOOC participants do not have to register for the class. However, doing so allows them to stay in touch more easily with others in the course and to receive mailings about the course and associated activities.

Why digital citizenship?

The web is so pervasive and invisible, and provides access to so many different kinds of experiences, that we have developed a keen and sometimes urgent interest in understanding how best to help our children and ourselves navigate this new world.
In the K12 educational arena, this interest has been given the name “digital citizenship,” a reference to our belief that the Internet offers a kind of community experience. Digital citizenship seeks to answer the question, “What does it mean to be a model citizen in this new kind of community?” Ultimately, it also addresses another essential question: “How can we maintain a sense of humanity as we learn to co-exist with the immensely powerful machines and networks of our own creation?”

What is addressed?

In practical terms, the course looks at policies, curriculum, tools and perspectives that address digital citizenship issues within the K-12 educational arena. It also addresses some of the hot button issues of the day, such as cyberbullying, media literacy, and how to make ethical decisions associated with online activities. It features some of the experts in the field, including Mike Ribble (Digital Citizenship in the Schools), Nancy Willard (CyberSavvy), Frank Gallagher (Cable in the Classroom).

Who is this course for?

The primary audience for this course is K12 education community members, including teachers, students, administrators, school board members. But this course is also for parents, community members, anyone from government or business- in short, anyone interested in the larger issues involved in living, learning, working and having fun in the digital age, particularly as those issues impact our children.

Other Resources:
Bullying and Technology: What does it mean for parents?

For Parents and Community
http://evanston.suntimes.com/people/voices/cyb_erbully-EVA-01092014:article

FOSI.org

Family Online Safety Contract
Check out our Resources tab featuring helpful tips for parents and kids during back-to-school season, and download a copy of our the safety contract.
This video might be helpful as well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSQ6GcskLNg
FOSI GRID ( International)http://www.fosigrid.org
FOSI’s Global Resource and Information Directory (GRID) is designed to create a single, factual and up-to-date source for all those dedicated to making the Internet a safer and better place. As a family online safety portal, it aggregates information from a comprehensive range of trusted sources and combined with expert oversight, provides a unique and exciting new collaborative platform.

GRID monitors, tracks and provides commentary on the efforts of countries around the world to make the Internet safer for their citizens. By placing them in their correct cultural context, the educational, legislative and regulatory approach of many countries is seen properly for the first time. GRID is already attracting praise:
“FOSI’s GRID is a remarkable and ground breaking achievement! Nothing can prepare you for the depth, quality and scale of the family online safety content that GRID delivers. It will provide a vital and important new collaborative tool for industry, government and online safety professionals throughout the world.”
Professor Tanya Byron – Leading child psychologist and author of the Children in a Digital World Report, an influential review commissioned by the UK Government.
Using the very latest technology, GRID’s interactive maps, timelines and easy to use features bring clarity and new insights. Comprehensive directories that scope the work of industry and define the challenges, as well as GRID’s expert-moderated updates and quarterly reviews, create a unique ‘one stop shop.’

Who is Parry Aftab.. one of those of us who started out with the Clinton Initiative NIIAC> She is a real Internet lawyer.http://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/2013/12/19/cyberlaw-expert-parry-aftab-talks-cyberbullying-and-online-student-safety-at-the-a-439412.html#.UsgF2_2c8dt

Wired Safety Video on Cyber-bullying. It’s the Best!!
http://stopcyberbullying.org

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Teacher Tool Kit from Wired Safety

Your personalized resource. You can fill out information at the link above to get it.

Stop Cyber Bullying Toolkit is now available! http://stopcyberbullying.org/index2.php
Authored by Dr. Parry Aftab and created by WiredSafety.org,Who is Parry Aftab?
She is a real Cyberlawyer.
the toolkit provides all of the information a school or community organization needs; it also provides young people with a mission.
Through the StopCyberbullying Pledge, they can take a stand against cyberbullying. By taking the pledge they promise to be part
of the solution, not part of the problem. The entire StopCyberbullying program is designed to motivate schools, students,
and their parents to do something, not just stand there while others are hurt. It gives them the tools and information
that they need to create their own grassroots campaign and address cyberbullying and hate online wherever they find it.

Peer Gathered Resources from Scoop.it

child

http://www.scoop.it/t/digital-citizenship-goals-in-education

Vic and Bonnie Sutton
Scoop.it? http://www.scoop.it/

Gamification you ask? Glad you asked. Alex Wonder!!
!Alex Wonder Kid Cyberdetective is a new game introduced by WiredSafety.org designed to help children safely navigate the Internet. Children follow the adventures of Alex Wonder as he helps children learn to identify the warning signs of cyberbullying and learn how to responsibly use the Internet.

“…The game teaches kids how to spot, avoid and address cyberbullying. So, they have to qualify as kid cyber detectives who help Alex, who works out of the janitor’s closet at the middle school, learn how to help other kids being cyber bullied,” explained Parry Aftab, Executive Director, WiredSafety, to CNN in an interview. Download the new free Alex Wonder Kid Cyberdetective Agency Game to help stop cyberbullying
**Requires Adobe Air to Install
bottom of page here ,http://stopcyberbullying.org/index2.html

Mobile Devices, and Learning, a Cure for the Digital Divide?

I was first intrigued with mobile learning on a flight to Aukland, New Zealand. The small child across the aisle from me, clutched his device for every waking hour of the flight. I could not see what was on the device, I know it was an Apple IPhone. I was too polite to ask what it was that he was using on the phone… In countless planes, trains and even in an automobile, the problem of boredom seemed to be reduced. The mobile device seems to have solved those types of problems. To think of the power of Mobile look at this infographic . It is a good digital display of what is happening.

Some information on the trends  about mobile devices. And here is an infographic on the state of digital education. You won’t believe your eyes.

The Horizon Report and other futuring reports include the use of mobile devices.

It won't replace you, it will enhance the learning environment!

Mobile Devices

At a visit to the National Geographic I had to pay attention to the device that was questioning me about my geographic knowledge. The device was counting answers and giving instantaneous feedback.

But are what mobile devices are  allowed in schools? Are the powerful intersections of visualization, powerful content and models being kept away from the classroom? STEM resources are mostly available in imagery, visualization , modeling and embedded assessment, online.

In her Mindshift Blog, Tina Barsegihan states:

One of the most exciting things about living in the digital age is witnessing huge cultural changes occur in real time.

We’re at just that point now with mobile learning. Whether it’s on an e-reader, a tablet, or a cell phone, there’s great excitement — though not a lot of research yet — around the potential of how these devices can strengthen learning.

“There are frontiers that we’re just beginning to learn how to reach.”

“What if your mobile device had a sixth sense?” asked Harvard professor Chris Dede, who’s researching the diverse dimensions of mobile learning, at the recent ISTE conference.

When most of us consider education, we think of learning happening in isolated places — schools. But mobile devices are upending that assumption. With innovations like augmented reality, different kinds of information and experiences can be superimposed onto the real world, complementing and adding another dimension to “formal” learning institutions.

Pilot programs are springing up all over the country (more on those soon), as educators and researchers determine what kind of learning can happen best with mobile devices.

“We know from generations of work that devices are catalysts,” Dede said. “The device never produces learning, but when coupled with changes in content, new forms of assessment, linking people together, that’s what enables learning.”

Chis Dede talks about mobile learning : ” Learning a variety of content and skills anytime, anyplace wit a small device light enough to be carried in one hand.” Chis Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, Harvard University

Jason Ohler.” Virtual learning and the availability of digital content have changed to offer more methods of student engagement, increased customization of learning objects, open resources, and personalized education..

Imaging the Universe, You can't do that with a book

Learning using visual Imagery

Digital citizenship is impossible until we help students live one life instead two. Right now they live two—a digitally unplugged life at school and digitally deluged life outside school. Having them bring their devices to school is a great first step in creating a reality-based environment for the discussion of digital citizenship. But what do we do about those students who have nothing to bring?posted by Jason Ohler
May 19, 2011

” Learning in the 21st Century, Taking it Mobile“ was a conference I attended about a year ago.. We know that the policy, process and technology infrastructures that are adopted over the next few years will shape education for decades. We also know that the lack of broadband is a problem in many places in the US. We have been talking about 21stCentury adaptations and transformation for many years. It is still a goal. . Many think the devices will change the learning landscape and equalize access.

DIGITAL DIVIDE

There is a dark side of the digital divide without broadband. Everyone assumes that people can access high powered sites. The FCC is busy working to create broadband for all but the realization of this will probably be a long time in coming. The sad part of this is the lack of classroom access in some parts of the US. We are told the new E-rate will help to solve this, but it is a BIG problem. Sometimes the people who need access most are out of sight , out of mind.

We had a big discussion on the District of Columbia schools and what the teachers were or were not accomplishing, but no one questioned their lack of technology support in training, in devices, and in content integration. Quietly, the discussions are going on in various school systems, but there is no conclusion as to what really works. 

Teaching online , anywhere anytime, Henry Neeman does outreach to all from Oklahoma

Reaching out to involve students and faculty in Supercomputing

As mobile devices become ubiquitous, students are using then to facilitate learning and enhance productivity in and out of school.  There are roadblocks, but the most difficult to solve is the disconnect of access. After that, there is the concerns about cyberbullying and creating a platform of use that is reflective of the purposes of the task in education.

At the conference we mulled over these questions and they stay with me still.

The Digital Divide is always a question.

What do mobile wireless devices contribute as a platform for bringing education innovation and best practices to scale?

What do mobile wireless devices contribute as an enabler of innovative powerful methods for teaching and learning?

How can we complement the current educational infrastructure( computers, wires) with the emerging wireless mobiles, cloud based infrastructure? What are key challenges in financing, implementation and policy?

How can we plan to accommodate the rapid evolution of mobile devices?

How would you answer these questions?

Moblie Device at Blue Waters Kiosk at NSF Expo ExhibitMobile Devices capture the attention of students. who have never seen or used these devices before. This is outreach for the Teragrid.

Research, 2010 and Our Future, Students Speak Up about Their Vision for 21st Century Learninghttp://www.tomorrow.org/

Edutopia 

The Internet is an astonishing source of educational resources: Lesson plans, classroom-product reviews, and even psychological support for those dark days when your students (or your coworkers) are straining your mental balance are only a Google search away. The trick, however, is getting that pipeline of online information flowing throughout your school, including directly into classroom PCs. Computers are often centralized in a media center, building codes can be prohibitive for setting up a broadband feed, and most schools are short-changed when it comes necessary tech support.

Here is a recipe for wireless access for those on the digital dirt road or for the understanding of those who did not get to attend the conference from the George Lucas Educational Foundation that is a how to.. The project is entitled the Digital Generation.

Welcome to the Digital Generation

http://www.edutopia.org/digital-generation-project-overview-video


What Devices?

There are a lot of devices that can be included in this discussion. The ones I know are,mobile and associated technologies, smart phones, IPod, IPhones, Netbooks, digital clickers, chargers and battery packs ,mobile interactive whiteboards.


Wireless to the Rescue

http://www.edutopia.org/tech-teacher-wireless-rescue


Taking it Mobile

Access to smartphones has more than tripled among high school students since 2006, according to a survey report from Project Tomorrow®, a national education nonprofit organization, and Blackboard Inc.

The report ,Learning in the 21st Century: Taking it Mobile!shows that students now view the inability to use their own devices in school, such as cell phones, smart phones, MP3 players, laptops or net books, as the primary barrier to a successful digital education. The various reports can be found here.

Can we Change the Digital Divide with Mobile Devices?

The FCC Chairman indicated in his discussions early in the year that Digital Tools may be the solution to the digital divide

Mobile Divide…. What Can we Learn about Making a Difference with Mobile Technology?

Philosophy of the Mobile Divide In the US

Mobile Digital Divide– According to a new study on U.S. consumers and mobile from the Pew Research Center, an unprecedented 60% of adults in the U.S. access go online wirelessly, whether by laptop or cell phone. Two factors are driving this trend, and shaking up any preconceived notions about America’s digital divide.

Finding #1:“Cell phone ownership is higher among African-Americans and Latinos than among whites (87% vs. 80%) and minority cell phone owners take advantage of a much greater range of their phones’ features compared with white mobile phone users. In total, 64% of African-Americans access the internet from a laptop or mobile phone, a seven-point increase from the 57% who did so at a similar point in 2009.”

Finding #2: “Young adults (those ages 18-29) are also avid users of mobile data applications, but older adults are gaining fast. Compared with 2009, cell phone owners ages 30-49 are significantly more likely to use their mobile device to send text messages, access the internet, take pictures, record videos, use email or instant messaging, and play music.”

What’s driving more Blacks and Hispanics, and older adults, to mobile?

According to Pew spokesman Aaron W. Smith, increased mobile web usage is driven by two key factors: age and economics. A younger demo with an annual income of $30,000 or less a year has jumped in usage, and African-Americans and Hispanics are younger and have less money than the general white population.

Mobile is thus bridging the digital gap between the traditional distinction of haves and have-nots, and while it’s a positive trend, it’s still a gap between those with cellphone-only access and those with computers as well.

About 18% of African-Americans use a cellphone as their sole device for Internet access compared to about 10% of whites. That said, laptop ownership has risen from 34% in 2009 to a current 51% among African-Americans.

Overall, 59% of Americans now access the Internet through mobile devices as opposed to 51% a year ago. So mobile may prove to be the ultimate equalizer, at least on the digital playing field.

Other interesting facts from the study reveal that Americans are using their mobile devices to (as ranked by Pew’s latest stats vs. April 2009)

The most interesting discussions are about the way in which wireless can be deployed. Bring your own wireless, netbooks using the cloud, and a variety of ways to solve the digital divide were proposed.

This from Mindshift

Bring-your-own-device classrooms. Since most kids these days already have access to a mobile device, schools are seizing the opportunity to turn these gadgets from distractions into learning tools by incorporating these devices into classroom lessons and projects. From mobile phones to laptop computers, teachers and students are increasingly bringing technology to the classroom, and in many school districts, it’s being put to good use.Numerous studies have highlighted the benefits of one-to-one computing programs in raising test scores and increasing college attendance, but with many districts strapped for cash and unable to provide devices for each student, this isn’t always a possibility. The solution may be found in asking students to bring their own devices to class, cutting back on the number of mobile devices the school needs to provide while still enhancing the learning experience.

What have mobile devices go to do with STEM and changing education in America?

Eliot Soloway ”

Are cellphones and other mobile devices powerful learning tools or intolerable classroom distractions?

For Elliot Soloway, the answer is a no-brainer. Cellphones, hand-held gaming gadgets, and netbooks—all relatively cheap, seemingly ever-present mobile devices used (and often abused) by today’s teenagers—can engage middle and high school students in learning inside and outside of school, he and other advocates of mobile learning say.”

STEM Applications you can’t replicate by talking or lecturing.

Windows to the Universe  ,Windows to the Universe explores the Earth, planets of our solar system, and the universe. It includes images, animations, and data sets, and information about books .

The Exploratorium,The Exploratorium isn’t just a museum; it’s an ongoing exploration of science, art, and human perception—a vast collection of online interactives, web features, activitiesprograms, and events that feed your curiosity.

Project Lead the Way

The PLTW Innovation Zone (aka the classroom) is an engaging and thought-provoking place, where students develop critical thinking skills through hands-on project-based learning, preparing them to take on real-world challenges. Students will have the opportunity to create, design and build things like robots and cars, applying what they are learning in math and science to the world’s grand challenges.

The PLTW program is designed to serve middle school and high school students of diverse backgrounds from those already interested in STEM-related fields to those who are more inspired by the application of STEM than they are by traditional math and science courses.

Whyville ,
What does it take to build a sustainable, green energy community? 8th Graders are showing us how using WhyPower, an interactive learning game within the largest interactive learning world, WhyVille. Here is an interactive game. http://www.poweracrosstexas.org/projects/whypower-interactive-game

Energy Game:  WHYPOWER

Whyville is a thriving community with its own economy, newspaper, government and much more.  It now has its own power grid!  As part of the WhyCareers program, we are “electrifying” Whyville with a power grid that uses traditional and renewable energy sources.  Students will manage the power grid to select the right mix of coal, natural gas, nuclear, hydroelectric, solar and wind energy. They will build homes in Whyville!  They will observe and measure power use in Whyville, and form good energy behaviors and habits. Finally, they will explore the math, science and career topics related to energy.  Just like in real life, success in Whyville is not pre-programmed!  Students skill, initiative, creativity and teamwork determines the rewards they receive and the “virtual money” they earn in WhyPower.
Whyville. Run a city using energy reources.

National Geographic FieldScope is a web-based mapping, analysis, and collaboration tool designed to support geographic investigations and engage students as citizen scientists investigating real-world issues – both in the classroom and in outdoor education settings. FieldScope enhances student scientific investigations by providing rich geographic context – through maps, mapping activities, and a rich community where student fieldwork and data is integrated with that of peers and professionals, adding analysis opportunities and meaning to student investigations.

NG FieldScope

  • uses cutting-edge technology to make interactive mapping and geospatial data analysis tools accessible to students via the web in an intuitive package that is free and does not require software installation.
  • enables students and classrooms to upload their own field data – including quantitative measurements, field notes, and media, such as photos – and to see it in relation to data from peers and professional scientists.
  • fosters collaborative sharing and analysis of data among the FieldScope community and beyond.

National Geographic is partnering with groups – across a range of scientific disciplines – that are interested in exploring how FieldScope can better support student geographic learning and outdoor investigations.

FieldScope Projects

Chesapeake Bay

http://www.serc.si.edu/education/resources/bluecrab/index.aspxThe Chesapeake Bay FieldScope Project is a “citizen science” initiative in which students investigate water quality issues on local and regional scales and collaborate with students across the Bay to analyze data and take action. Chesapeake Bay FieldScope is a project of National Geographic’s Education Programs in collaboration with theChesapeake Bay Foundation and the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office.

Online Labs

http://sharingtree.wordpress.com/2011/08/21/onlinelabs-in-virtual-laboratory-simulations-for-science-education/

Resource from the Federal Trade Commission

Admongo.gov kids learn critical thinking skills and apply them to understanding advertising.

It is an on line game.

Digital Citizenship

Living Life Online   there is a book available from the FTC that accompanies this project as a digital citizenship iniative. Bulk orders are available at bulkorder.ftc.gov

Julia Barnathan (standing), curriculum developer for Northwestern’s Office of STEM Education Partnerships, assists a student with a lesson in radiation that uses iLabs to access a geiger counter at the University of Queensland, Australia.
CREDIT: Amanda Morris, Office for Research, Northwestern University